Steven Chapp and Diane Kilgore Condon at if ART Gallery

Kilgore Condon -- Seed Eaters
Kilgore Condon — Seed Eaters

NOW ON VIEW @ if ART Gallery

STEVEN CHAPP: Running With Crows

&

DIANE KILGORE CONDON: Holding The Songbird

 

Through January 10, 2015

 

 

if ART Gallery presents two simultaneous December-January solo exhibitions of paintings and prints by two Upstate South Carolina artists, Easley’s Steven Chapp and Greenville’s Diane Kilgore Condon. Both exhibitions, Running With Crows and Holding The Songbird respectively, opened last week and will run through January 10, 2014.

Steven Chapp, owner of Black Dog Press, will conduct a drypoint workshop at if ART on Saturday, January 10, 2015, 10:00 am ­– 4:00 pm. During the workshop, participants will create their own drypoint plates, which will be printed by Chapp at the end of the workshop. Enrollment will be limited to 10 participants; cost is $65 per participant. Those interested should contact the gallery to enroll.

Both artists typically include a lot of animal imagery. Chapp has a go-to-bird, the crow, which features in many of his monotypes, drypoints, linocuts, woodcuts and other prints as a metaphor for humans. Kilgore Condon creates in her oil paintings fantastical but technically often possible scenes featuring birds of many kinds, bees, deer, hare, geese, dogs and other animals.

Chapp - Point Taken
Chapp – Point Taken

            Chapp (B. 1952) is a native of Kansas City, Mo. For three decades, he has been a steady presence on the South Carolina art scene, especially in the Upstate. Best known as a expert printmaker, Chapp has shown in galleries, art centers and museums throughout the region, including the Greenville County (S.C.) Museum of Art, the Burroughs and Chapin Museum in Myrtle Beach, S.C., the Spartanburg (S.C.) Art Museum and the Pickens County (S.C.) Museum of Art and History. He worked on two projects with artists Christo and Jeanne-Claude, in Kansas City in 1978 and Key Biscayne, Fla., in 1983. In 2011 and 2014, Chapp organized Shifting Plates I and II, traveling exhibitions of works by South Carolina printmakers. Chapp has retired as a teacher for the Greenville County School District. He holds an MFA in printmaking and drawing from Clemson University and a BFA from Appalachian State University.

Kilgore Condon (b. 1964) is the owner of ArtBomb Studios. ArtBomb, established in 2001, launched what is now Greenville’s most important arts district, the Pendleton Street Art District. The Wassau, Wis., native was raised in the East and Midwest and in 1983 moved from Florida to Greenville to attend Bob Jones University. There she studied with Carl Blair and in 1988 received a BA in Fine Arts. Kilgore Condon is among the South Carolina Upstate’s most prolific and respected painters.

 

Drypoint Workshop Steven Chapp:

Sat., Jan. 10, 2015, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

 

Gallery Hours: Weekdays, 11 a.m. – 7 p.m.; Saturdays, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.;

& by appointment

 

For more information, contact Wim Roefs at if ART:

(803) 238-2351 – wroefs@sc.rr.com

if ART Gallery

1223 Lincoln St.

Columbia, SC 29201

 

 

 

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“Jack Frost” – Melissa Swick Ellington reviews the world premiere of the new show at Columbia Children’s Theatre

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Columbia Children’s Theatre presents Jack Frost, a world premiere musical with book and lyrics by Crystal Aldamuy and music by Paul Lindley II, through Sunday, December 14. Here in Columbia, SC, we have plenty of reasons to be grateful for the presence of CCT in our community, such as high quality children’s theatre performed by professional actors, educational outreach programs, and theatre training and performance opportunities for youth. Yet another reason to cherish CCT emerges with the production of Jack Frost, which further establishes the theatre’s commitment to the development of new works. Past original productions have included adaptations of Puss and Boots, The Snow Queen, A Christmas Carol, and a number of commedia dell’arte shows. Any artist who has collaborated on the production of new work for the theatre can tell you that such endeavors require a special level of dedication, hard work, and ingenuity.  We are fortunate to have a children’s theatre in Columbia that persists in the development and presentation of new plays and musicals right here in our own community.  Audiences will be delighted by the enchanting and upbeat experience of Jack Frost.

Director Jerry Stevenson delivers an entertaining production of this clever new musical by Aldamuy and Lindley.  Creative characters, inventive humor, and enjoyable music delighted the audience at the matinee I attended with my husband and two young children. The story explores the family life of the title character, focusing on parent-child conflict over tradition and responsibilities. While Isis and Ike Frost expect their son Jack to become part of the family business, Jack would rather cause mischief and go on adventures than toil away producing individual snowflakes or painting leaves. The warm Kringle family poses a worthy counterpoint to the icy Frost folks. When Crystal, the Kringle daughter, switches places with Jack, both families have a lot to learn.

Composer/Music Director Paul Lindley II as Jack Frost, changing the colors of the autumn leaves
Composer/Music Director Paul Lindley II as Jack Frost, changing the colors of the autumn leaves

Not only have Aldamuy and Lindley created the material for their first original musical, they are also involved in this production. Aldamuy has devised crisp choreography for numbers such as “Reindeer Tango” as well as providing stage management expertise. As Jack Frost, Lindley captivates the audience with his agile antics and impressive singing voice, evident in “Jack’s Ballad” among other strong musical numbers. Julian Deleon provides a comforting paternal presence as Chris Kringle, thus achieving another successful foray on the CCT stage. Rachel Arling (Christine Kringle, and – full disclosure – a contributor to Jasper), Carol Beis (Isis Frost), and Charley Krawczyk (Ike Frost) energize their scenes with appealing performances, while Kaitlyn Fuller portrays Crystal with vivacity and charm. Anthony Harvey plays the dual roles of Old Man Winter and Elf; his impish Elf becomes the show’s comedic engine. My preschool son’s belly laughs testified to Harvey’s hilarious and skillful portrayal, not to mention the kid’s desire to imitate some of the Elf’s inventive shenanigans. (At certain performances, Toni V. Moore plays Isis Frost, Jerryanna Williams plays Crystal Kringle, and Lee O. Smith plays Chris Kringle.)

(L-R) Kaitlyn Fuller, Julian Deleon, Rachel Arling, Anthony
(L-R) Kaitlyn Fuller, Julian Deleon, Rachel Arling, Anthony Harvey

Costume design (Donna Harvey and Stevenson), scenic artistry (Jim Litzinger, Stevenson, D. Harvey and A. Harvey), and sound design (Lindley) maintain the high standards of artistic quality that distinguish CCT performances. Distinctive color palettes work effectively to differentiate the worlds of Frost and Kringle, especially through the superb costuming choices. Matt Wright (Sound Technician) and Brandi Smith (Light Board Operator) also provide valuable technical support.

It is a credit to the community’s enthusiasm for CCT that a brand new and unknown work can draw a packed house similar to audiences that attend more familiar plays. My first grade daughter is always eager to go whenever I suggest a trip to CCT. Show title, genre, characters?  No concerns of hers; she is just elated at the prospect of another show. You see, my daughter – like so many of us in Columbia – trusts that whatever production she sees at CCT, she will have a great experience. Thank goodness for the extraordinary talents at Columbia Children’s Theatre for their vision and artistry. We can’t wait to see what they dream up next.

~ Melissa Swick Ellington

 

The world premiere of Jack Frost continues through this Sunday, Dec. 14, with morning, matinee, and evening performances.  For ticket information, call (803) 691-4548 or visit http://www.columbiachildrenstheatre.com/jack-frost/.  And don’t forget – there’s also Late Night (i.e. 8 PM rather than 7 PM) Date Night for Mom and Dad on Friday, December 12, and when the kids are away, the actors will play!  The cast performs the same script, but loosen up and bring out double (and triple) entendres for a riotous evening of PG-13-ish fun.  This is an unpredictable evening of fun and surprises that is pretty much guaranteed to make you say, “I can’t believe they got away with that in a Children’s Theatre!” Recommended for ages 17 and up.  And while 8:00 may be late for Children’s Theatre folk, it’s still early enough (since the show only runs one hour) that you can head out into the night for more fun, in a great mood, after having laughed yourself silly!  For more info or tickets, visit http://www.columbiachildrenstheatre.com/event/late-night-jack-frost/

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Get Osamu Kobayashi While You Can – Thursday night at 80808

Osamu Kobayashi
Osamu Kobayashi

 

The process of painting is a power struggle. I take my paintings one way; they want to go
somewhere else. And when they go somewhere else; I drag them in another direction.
In the end, the paintings usually wins.

My work is reductive in form, often compositionally centered, and employs a spontaneous
and intuitive array of colors, shapes, and textures. Using these elements I create visual
dualities: chance vs. control, organic vs. geometric, warm vs. cool, large vs. small, etc.

Like a good story, the elements that comprise each work push and pull off of each other,
creating a unified structure that stays contained–but never becomes subdued–within its
own parameters.

The aim is to create work with a sensation similar to that of a clear thought: the idea has its
bases covered; there’s no room for argument. In reality, however, these paintings can never
be clear thoughts; they are much more open than that. They are more of a confrontation:
between what I desire to know and what I can never know entirely. — Osamu Kobayashi

 

If you read the most recent issue of Jasper you know how proud we are of our native son Osamu Kobayashi whose visual arts career has already lifted off the launch pad, sparks flying, smoke roiling, and is making that last almost slo-mo ascent into space. Right now, we can shade our eyes against the brightness, but soon he’ll be another one of those star-like satellites in the sky that we can identify by its placement and history, but no longer actually touch. (Unless we sneak in a visit with him when he comes home to see Shige and the rest of his family on one of those rare, super-artist holidays.)

Osamu%20Kobayashi%20Postcard%20front%2072dpi

Watch this video by Brian Harmon starring Columbia Museum of Art chief curator Will South as well as Osamu’s very proud brother Shigeharu Kobayashi to learn more about Osamu’s upcoming exhibit this Thursday, December 12th at Vista Studios Gallery 80808 at 808 Lady Street.

Don’t miss a chance to meet and chat with Osamu while he’s in Columbia.

See you Thursday night at this free Columbia arts event.

Read more about Osamu here.

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